ISLE OF COLL

This secret gem of the Hebrides is situated a few miles west of Mull. You may have heard Coll described as the quiet and relaxing paradise island, great for those seeking peace and quiet and who enjoy nature. And it certainly is that, but there is more than that to draw you to our wonderful island…

Coll Watersports
Coll Dark Skies

WELCOME

Visitors from across the globe are drawn back by the welcome received on Coll. Visitors are invited, and encouraged, to join in with community events. One of the fishing competitions even requires the boats to carry a visitor as part of the crew!

WEATHER

We enjoy the same climate (some may say better) as our neighbour, Tiree. Tiree is commonly known as the ‘sunshine isle’ because it has official weather readings demonstrating that Coll and Tiree enjoy amongst the highest hours of sunshine per annum.  In the winter, we benefit from the more moderate temperatures brought to us by the Gulf Stream, meaning Coll is often warmer than the mainland, and an ideal winter break.

BEACHES & WATERSPORTS

Coll has over 30 stunning beaches which are generally afforded privacy from nearby properties. Even during the busy season, you and your friends or family may find you have one to yourself. Each beach is different, with some being used for beach rugby/football, others for swimming or surfing and, of course, sandcastles and flying kites. Whether you want to relax and watch the seals and otters, or be a bit more adventurous, Coll has the perfect beach for you. adventure. Bring your own surfboard, kayak, sand yacht or kite, and enjoy.

WILDLIFE

It doesn’t matter if you are an expert or an amateur in the fields of ornithology, botany or marine science, Coll regularly gets visitors excited with its vast range of (often rare) wildlife, flora and fauna. The UK’s leading expert tells us that Coll is the best place in the UK to see the rare and elusive corncrake. Early April is the time to be amazed by the skydance of the hen harrier, and July is when the machair comes in to full bloom and delivers a carpet of wildflowers across large fields. The Basking shark is a reliable annual visitor to our shores, to the extent that Coll is used as a base for ground-breaking research. The RSPB have a large reserve on Coll with a small information centre open 24/7, and a couple of corncrake viewing spots.

NIGHTLIFE

Coll is the only Scottish island to have been awarded International Dark Sky Community status by the International Dark-Sky Association. One of only 22 worldwide locations to hold this status. This designation, granted in 2013, is in recognition of a lot of hard work by a small group of locals, developing an outdoor lighting management plan and demonstrating that the sky on Coll is dark whether you are in the village or further afield. On a clear night, and we have many of them, you can take in the Milky Way in all its splendour, while enjoying a drink in the grounds of the Coll Hotel. If you wake up in the middle of the night, take a peak out the window, you might even be unable to resist putting your shoes on and heading out!

ISLE OF COLL

This secret gem of the Hebrides is situated a few miles west of Mull. You may have heard Coll described as the quiet and relaxing paradise island, great for those seeking peace and quiet and who enjoy nature. And it certainly is that, but there is more than that to draw you to our wonderful island…

Visitors from across the globe are drawn back by the welcome received on Coll. Visitors are invited, and encouraged, to join in with community events. One of the fishing competitions even requires the boats to carry a visitor as part of the crew!
We enjoy the same climate (some may say better) as our neighbour, Tiree. Tiree is commonly known as the ‘sunshine isle’ because it has official weather readings demonstrating that Coll and Tiree enjoy amongst the highest hours of sunshine per annum. In the winter, we benefit from the more moderate temperatures brought to us by the Gulf Stream, meaning Coll is often warmer than the mainland, and an ideal winter break.
Coll Watersports
Coll has over 30 stunning beaches which are generally afforded privacy from nearby properties. Even during the busy season, you and your friends or family may find you have one to yourself. Each beach is different, with some being used for beach rugby/football, others for swimming or surfing and, of course, sandcastles and flying kites. Whether you want to relax and watch the seals and otters, or be a bit more adventurous, Coll has the perfect beach for you. adventure. Bring your own surfboard, kayak, sand yacht or kite, and enjoy.

It doesn’t matter if you are an expert or an amateur in the fields of ornithology, botany or marine science, Coll regularly gets visitors excited with its vast range of (often rare) wildlife, flora and fauna. The UK’s leading expert tells us that Coll is the best place in the UK to see the rare and elusive corncrake. Early April is the time to be amazed by the skydance of the hen harrier, and July is when the machair comes in to full bloom and delivers a carpet of wildflowers across large fields. The Basking shark is a reliable annual visitor to our shores, to the extent that Coll is used as a base for ground-breaking research. The RSPB have a large reserve on Coll with a small information centre open 24/7, and a couple of corncrake viewing spots.

Coll Dark Skies

Coll is the only Scottish island to have been awarded International Dark Sky Community status by the International Dark-Sky Association. One of only 22 worldwide locations to hold this status. This designation, granted in 2013, is in recognition of a lot of hard work by a small group of locals, developing an outdoor lighting management plan and demonstrating that the sky on Coll is dark whether you are in the village or further afield. On a clear night, and we have many of them, you can take in the Milky Way in all its splendour, while enjoying a drink in the grounds of the Coll Hotel. If you wake up in the middle of the night, take a peak out the window, you might even be unable to resist putting your shoes on and heading out!

“Went for two nights, stayed for three. Great community owned hostel. The residents of Coll are the nicest people you could ever meet. Eating out is very good, both at the Coll Hotel and the Island Cafe. Seen my first Corncrake and watched TEN otters at play in a beautiful sandy, turquoise bay. Can’t wait to return to the best wee island in the world.”

COLL BUNKHOUSE GUEST – JUNE 2016

“Went for two nights, stayed for three. Great community owned hostel. The residents of Coll are the nicest people you could ever meet. Eating out is very good, both at the Coll Hotel and the Island Cafe. Seen my first Corncrake and watched TEN otters at play in a beautiful sandy, turquoise bay. Can’t wait to return to the best wee island in the world.”

COLL BUNKHOUSE GUEST – JUNE 2016

LOCAL AMENITIES

With the exception of the airport and the RSPB reserve, Coll’s amenities are found in the village of Arinagour. Coll’s businesses are open all year round but, thankfully, are not 24/7 and our shops are not open on a Sunday. Timetables can be found locally (An Cridhe usually has one at reception), and businesses are generally open in the mornings (to tie in with ferry schedules) but not always in the afternoon.

Coll Amenities

ISLAND STORES 
Our general grocers with fresh supplies and sundry items you may need. You can place an order to be collected on arrival. (No card payments)

T.E.S.Coll
Complementing Island Stores, this shop has an enviable range of food and drink to suit a wide variety of diets. It also has ethically sourced sundry items. You can even buy your spices and herbs by the gram.

COLL HOTEL
The Coll Hotel has recently opened a brand new extension over looking the harbour in Arinagour which houses a lounge bar, restaurant and public bar with pool table. It serves the same menu throughout (booking recommended in busier periods) and is open to non-residents. Local shellfish, and other locally-sourced produce, form the mainstay of their menu whenever possible. You can enjoy a breakfast here if you book in advance.
www.collhotel.com

ISLAND CAFE
Complementing the Coll Hotel, the café offers a range of hearty meals and also sources local produce for its menu. It is well known locally for its hearty Sunday Roasts.

COLL POST OFFICE
Coll’s post office is open 6 days a week in the morning and offers cash withdrawals for a wide variety of banks.

AN ACARSAID
This small gift shop, with a great range of gifts and holiday toys, is housed within the Post Office.

ROSS OF COLL
Another wee gift shop specialising in stylish Coll inspired clothing, cards, prints and more. Accepts card payments.
www.rossofcoll.com

AN CRIDHE SATURDAY MARKET
Coll’s community centre plays home to the local produce of the Saturday markets from late March to early October. Clothing, cards, preserves, jewellery, fresh produce and more. An honesty box system is in operation outside of market hours for some of the local produce available at the markets.

FRESH SHELLFISH
If you catch up with our shell-fishermen at the pier you may be able to arrange some shellfish for your evening meal, and perhaps even enjoy a barbecue of langoustine.

AN CRIDHE
Coll’s modern community centre is a fantastic multi-purpose building with space to relax (with a cuppa), read a book in the quiet room, play with the kids, or enjoy some sports in the main hall (price list at reception). On display is a gallery of Coll Then & Now images and, from time to time, artist exhibitions. A visit is required to complete your holiday on Coll.

LOCAL AMENITIES

With the exception of the airport and the RSPB reserve, Coll’s amenities are found in the village of Arinagour. Coll’s businesses are open all year round but, thankfully, are not 24/7 and our shops are not open on a Sunday. Timetables can be found locally (An Cridhe usually has one at reception), and businesses are generally open in the mornings (to tie in with ferry schedules) but not always in the afternoon.

Coll Amenities

ISLAND STORES 
Our general grocers with fresh supplies and sundry items you may need. You can place an order to be collected on arrival. (No card payments)

T.E.S.Coll
Complementing Island Stores, this shop has an enviable range of food and drink to suit a wide variety of diets. It also has ethically sourced sundry items. You can even buy your spices and herbs by the gram.

COLL HOTEL
The Coll Hotel has recently opened a brand new extension over looking the harbour in Arinagour which houses a lounge bar, restaurant and public bar with pool table. It serves the same menu throughout (booking recommended in busier periods) and is open to non-residents. Local shellfish, and other locally-sourced produce, form the mainstay of their menu whenever possible. You can enjoy a breakfast here if you book in advance.
www.collhotel.com

ISLAND CAFE
Complementing the Coll Hotel, the café offers a range of hearty meals and also sources local produce for its menu. It is well known locally for its hearty Sunday Roasts.

COLL POST OFFICE
Coll’s post office is opening 6 days a week in the morning and offers cash withdrawals for a wide variety of banks.

AN ACARSAID
This small gift shop, with a great range of gifts and holiday toys, is housed within the Post Office.

ROSS OF COLL
Another wee gift shop specialising in stylish Coll inspired clothing, cards, prints and more. Accepts card payments.
www.rossofcoll.com

AN CRIDHE SATURDAY MARKET
Coll’s community centre plays home to the local produce of the Saturday markets from late March to early October. Clothing, cards, preserves, jewellery, fresh produce and more. An honesty box system is in operation outside of market hours for some of the local produce available at the markets.

FRESH SHELLFISH
If you catch up with our shell-fishermen at the pier you may be able to arrange some shellfish for your evening meal, and perhaps even enjoy a barbecue of langoustine.

AN CRIDHE
Coll’s modern community centre is a fantastic multi-purpose building with space to relax (with a cuppa), read a book in the quiet room, play with the kids, or enjoy some sports in the main hall (price list at reception). On display is a gallery of Coll Then & Now images and, from time to time, artist exhibitions. A visit is required to complete your holiday on Coll.

TRAVEL

Although it’s remote, getting to Coll is not as hard as you might think, and the journey in itself offers the most spectacular views.

BY FERRY
There are daily ferries during the summer months, operated by Calmac, and the journey takes just over 2 hours 30 minutes from Oban. With opportunities to spot wildlife and take in the spectacular scenery, it makes a great way to start your island adventure. Calmac have recently updated their website and have some excellent advice on travelling to Coll via Oban in their Coll Destination Guide. In the winter, the ferry serves Coll five days a week, so why not take advantage of Coll’s milder winter climate and enjoy a short break or long weekend on the beach?

BY AIR
For even more spectacular views, there are also regular flights with Hebridean Air from Oban to Coll airport and the trip lasts around 30 minutes. These generally operate on a Wednesday but weekend flights are sometimes available at short notice.

A less common, but manageable option, is to fly from Glasgow to Tiree with Loganair where you can then travel onward to Coll with either Calmac or Hebridean Air.   Tiree has a Ring ‘n’ Ride bus service which can be pre-booked to take you from Tiree Airport to ferry terminal if required.

TRAINS & BUSES TO OBAN
If you’re coming to Coll you will most likely be departing by ferry or plane from the Oban area. Trains from Edinburgh and Glasgow are operated by Scotrail, whilst Citylink provide a bus service throughout Scotland. There are spaces on the train to bring your bicycle, but make sure that you book a space for your bike in advance. You can also drive to Oban and leave your car in one of the free car parks if you want to save costs on the ferry crossing.

Please don’t hesitate to get in touch if you need some advice on getting to Coll or assistance planning your trip – our staff will be happy to help.

The Isle of Coll is easy to manage on bicycle or you can get off the beaten track on foot.

You are welcome to bring a car or other motorised vehicle with you. We would recommend you book the ferry as soon as you know your travel plans.

Island Tours are available with a local guide. Tours last two hours and visit the scenic beauty spots on Coll in a 4 x 4. For more information and booking, please call Juliet on 01879 230520 or Kip on 01879 230479.

Coll’s roads are all single-track. If you are not used to single-track roads, please read on.

UNMARKED EMERGENCY VEHICLES
Coll has a number of emergency responders (Doctor, Fire & Rescue, etc.) who will be using their own vehicles when responding. If a vehicle is flashing its lights at you, please make way as soon as you possibly can. In general, if a vehicle is travelling faster than you it is considered courteous to make way for them at your earliest convenience, and it lets you continue enjoying your journey at a relaxed pace.

PEDESTRIANS
Be aware that Coll has no pavements so pedestrians will be walking on the road, and on the windier days they may not hear your vehicle coming.

ONCOMING TRAFFIC
When you meet oncoming traffic you can pass them at a passing place. If the passing place is on your left, pull in to it. If it is on your right, stop on the road opposite the passing place and let the other vehicle pull in. Be aware that if the vehicle is less manoeuvrable and/or towing, it may on occasion be more practical for you to pull in to the passing place regardless of whether it is on your right or your left.

TRAVEL

Although it’s remote, getting to Coll is not as hard as you might think, and the journey in itself offers the most spectacular views.

BY FERRY
There are daily ferries during the summer months, operated by Calmac, and the journey takes just over 2 hours 30 minutes from Oban. With opportunities to spot wildlife and take in the spectacular scenery, it makes a great way to start your island adventure. Calmac have recently updated their website and have some excellent advice on travelling to Coll via Oban in their Coll Destination Guide. In the winter, the ferry serves Coll five days a week, so why not take advantage of Coll’s milder winter climate and enjoy a short break or long weekend on the beach?

BY AIR
For even more spectacular views, there are also regular flights with Hebridean Air from Oban to Coll airport and the trip lasts around 30 minutes. These generally operate on a Wednesday but weekend flights are sometimes available at short notice.

A less common, but manageable option, is to fly from Glasgow to Tiree with Loganair where you can then travel onward to Coll with either Calmac or Hebridean Air.   Tiree has a Ring ‘n’ Ride bus service which can be pre-booked to take you from Tiree Airport to ferry terminal if required.

TRAINS & BUSES TO OBAN
If you’re coming to Coll you will most likely be departing by ferry or plane from the Oban area. Trains from Edinburgh and Glasgow are operated by Scotrail, whilst Citylink provide a bus service throughout Scotland. There are spaces on the train to bring your bicycle, but make sure that you book a space for your bike in advance. You can also drive to Oban and leave your car in one of the free car parks if you want to save costs on the ferry crossing.

Please don’t hesitate to get in touch if you need some advice on getting to Coll or assistance planning your trip – our staff will be happy to help.

The Isle of Coll is easy to manage on bicycle or you can get off the beaten track on foot.

You are welcome to bring a car or other motorised vehicle with you. We would recommend you book the ferry as soon as you know your travel plans.

Island Tours are available with a local guide. Tours last two hours and visit the scenic beauty spots on Coll in a 4 x 4. For more information and booking, please call Juliet on 01879 230520 or Kip on 01879 230479.

Coll’s roads are all single-track. If you are not used to single-track roads, please read on.

UNMARKED EMERGENCY VEHICLES
Coll has a number of emergency responders (Doctor, Fire & Rescue, etc.) who will be using their own vehicles when responding. If a vehicle is flashing its lights at you, please make way as soon as you possibly can. In general, if a vehicle is travelling faster than you it is considered courteous to make way for them at your earliest convenience, and it lets you continue enjoying your journey at a relaxed pace.

PEDESTRIANS
Be aware that Coll has no pavements so pedestrians will be walking on the road, and on the windier days they may not hear your vehicle coming.

ONCOMING TRAFFIC
When you meet oncoming traffic you can pass them at a passing place. If the passing place is on your left, pull in to it. If it is on your right, stop on the road opposite the passing place and let the other vehicle pull in. Be aware that if the vehicle is less manoeuvrable and/or towing, it may on occasion be more practical for you to pull in to the passing place regardless of whether it is on your right or your left.

Coll Bunkhouse Logo

ARINAGOUR | ISLE OF COLL | ARGYLL | PA78 6SY

01879 230217 | info@collbunkhouse.co.uk

Coll Bunkhouse Logo

ARINAGOUR | ISLE OF COLL | ARGYLL | PA78 6SY

01879 230217 | info@collbunkhouse.co.uk